Advantage of Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery

Advantage of Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery New technologies are emerging all the time. As open heart surgery treatments advance, there are new options and choices facing patients. As you move toward open heart surgery as a treatment, consider all your options and weight the benefits and risks with your medical team to decide what the best course of action is for you. Open Heart Surgery It used to be that open heart surgery was a last-resort risk. The recovery time was slow and the procedure often left behind large scars which took a long time to heal. Traditional open heart surgery involved breaking through the ribcage, usually through the sternum itself, to reach the heart. This left the patient with a long, hard and often painful recovery. New techniques and technologies allow for a much less invasive option for most patients. Sternotomy Traditionally, open heart surgery, or sternotomy, meant entering the chest through a large incision, breaking the sternum to reach the heart, and performing the surgery. The potential problems included inflammation, swelling, pain, a longer recovery time, and infection. The s hock to the heart and the blood loss made it more difficult for patients to recover fully and heal efficiently. Fortunately, minimally invasive heart surgery options are now available. Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery With minimally invasive heart surgery, there is a much smaller incision, which can often be hidden beneath the fold of a breast. Since the incision is made between the rib bones rather than entering through the sternum, recovery time is much shorter and less painful. The risk of infection is also greatly lowered. The...

Inoperable Heart Disease – Tips to Find a Solution

Inoperable Heart Disease-  Tips For Finding Solutions A diagnosis of inoperable heart disease can be discouraging. A heart condition may be difficult to live with. Minimally invasive bloodless heart surgery may offer options that may not be possible with traditional methods. The treatment options available are dependent upon a number of conditions, including both your own physical health and the scope of experience of the doctors dealing with your case. Inoperable Heart Disease Each patient’s case is decided individually. There are steps you’ll need to take when facing a diagnosis of inoperable heart disease. It’s important not to panic or lose hope. Even if your case isn’t a good candidate for surgical options, there are many treatments available that can extend and improve the quality of your life.  Ask questions. Request that the medical doctor in charge of your case and your surgeon explain exactly why your case is considered “inoperable.” Be sure to write down the details of their answers.  Obtain copies of all of your diagnostic records, including imaging- CAT scans, catheterizations, echocardiograms, EKG and other reports.  Gather copies of all the reports pertinent to your case, including blood test and other results. Heart Disease Heart disease is not a completely-understood condition. There are many aspects that doctors have to make their best educated and trained guesses about the potential outcomes of treatment options. While you’re gathering your records, reach out for a second opinion.  Seek a second opinion. Gather your information and bring it to the new doctor, so that they may evaluate your case fully and to avoid repeating expensive testing.  Ask your doctor to...

What is a Normal Pulse Range

What is a Normal Pulse Range Following surgery, vital signs are carefully monitored in the hospital. You may find that your heart rate after open heart surgery has changed. Symptoms like a speeded up heart rate or a pulse deficit may indicate an fibrillation problem.  Normal Pulse Range The normal pulse rate for adults at rest ranges from 60-100 beats per minute. The normal pulse range can change after a surgery or under continuing stress. It’s important to check with your doctor to ensure your vital signs are where they should be for you. Everyone is different. An “average” is what’s normal for most people in the general population. What’s normal for you may vary. Pulse Deficit A pulse deficit occurs when your doctor can find a difference between the number of heartbeats observed with a monitor (like a stethoscope or EKG) and the pulse that’s able to be felt at the wrist or other pulse point. A pulse deficit happens when your heart is beating but the pulse isn’t reaching the extremities. It may indicate a weakness in your heart, atrial fibrillation, or very early ectopic beats. Vital Signs Your vital signs are the best indicator of your overall heart health. If you’re experiencing a change in your heart rate after open heart surgery, you will want to discuss your heart rate and blood pressure with your doctor. It’s important to learn to monitor your own heart rate at resting and during exercise so that you have a baseline to refer to when checking your pulse.  If you have any questions following your treatment or about your heart...

How Do I Prepare for Open Heart Surgery- Canton, OH

Preparing for Heart Surgery Open heart surgery involves any kind of surgery where the chest has to be cut open to allow surgeons access to muscles, valves, or arteries of the heart. This type of surgery generally takes around 4 to 6 hours but it painless with the use of anesthesia. Any kind of surgery can cause stress and anxiety because of the worry that something will go wrong, but here are a few tips on preparing for your surgery:               Talk to your doctor. Your doctor should know about any drugs you are taking. This includes any over-the-counter medication as well as vitamins and herbs. You should also tell your doctor about any diseases you have had including herpes, a cold, the flu, or even a fever.             Don’t take certain medicines like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen. These medications are blood-thinning and can affect blood clotting.             Be careful when you eat. It is recommended that you don’t eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your surgery.             Quit smoking. If you are having your heart surgery because of the harmful effects of smoking, you need to stop as soon as possible.             Eat a healthy diet. Starting to eat healthier will lower your blood pressure and could help prevent heart complications after your surgery. These are just a few general preparation tips to think about before your surgery, but your doctor will talk to you about anything else you may want to consider if your surgery date is approaching. Dr. Chiuffo and the Minimally Invasive and Bloodless Heart Surgery Program Dr. Chiuffo is dedicated...

Botox Might Help Heart Surgery Patients- Canton, OH

Botox for the Heart You might think that botox is only for smoothing out wrinkles and erasing signs of aging, but new studies show that botox might actually be able to help heart surgery patients! It was discovered that shots of botox into the heart can keep its beating more regular and lower the risk of heart complications like stroke, heart attack, or kidney failure. Heart bypass surgery is one operation that results in 10-50% of patients to develop abnormal heart rhythms. The Test Dr. Johnathon Steinburg at the University of Rochester decided to test the effects of botox on heart surgery patients and gathered some very interesting results. After injecting botox into the fat surrounding the heart of 50% of his heart surgery patients and saline into the other half to serve as a control, he discovered that of the patients who received the botox, only 7% developed arrhythmias. On the other hand, 30% of the control group developed arrhythmias. Additionally, a year after their operations, 0% of the botox injected group had abnormal heart patterns, compared to 27% of the saline group. How it Works Steinburg explains that by injecting botox into the area surrounding the heart, it paralyzes some excitatory signals that are typically sent to the heart after surgery. With fewer excitatory signals around the heart, its rhythm can stabilize more quickly. Not only can botox be used on heart surgery patients, but Steinburg also believes it may be useful in treating other heart rhythm problems as well. Dr. Chiuffo and the Minimally Invasive and Bloodless Heart Surgery Program Dr. Chiuffo is dedicated to ensuring...

Statins Help Reduce Heart Surgery Complications- Canton, OH

How Statins Reduce Complications   Having heart surgery can be stressful because of the risk of complications. However, there is a way to reduce heart surgery complications: statins. Statins can lower your cholesterol and also have anti-inflammatory properties. Statins are effective in reducing cardiac complications like atrial fibrillation and can also reduce the risk of death during and after your heart surgery. You should use statins before and after your heart surgery for maximum usefulness.   Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery   With minimally invasive heart surgery, patients can now enjoy quicker and more comfortable recoveries. This type of surgery is available even to patients who have been diagnosed as inoperable or high-risk, though it is still a good idea to take statins before and after your surgery. This type of surgery involves a surgical incision through a thin muscle layer between the ribs. There is no need to cut through any bone as there would be with traditional heart surgery. Though complications with this kind of surgery are rare, they can include bleeding, stroke, or wound infection. However, taking statins should lower the risk of these complications even further and help you be back on your feet within a few days. Statins   In addition to reducing the risk of heart complications after surgery, statins also have other benefits. Statins can help prevent chest pain, heart attacks, strokes, and intermittent claudication. Some examples of statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol, Lescol XL), lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor), simvastatin (Zocor), and pitavastatin (Livalo).   Dr. Chiuffo and the Minimally Invasive and Bloodless Heart Surgery Program Dr. Chiuffo is...